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On Thursday, March 23, 2017, the Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival and LOMAA will be co-presenting the final screening of the festival, Brett Story’s The Prison in Twelve Landscapes.

“More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt further away or more out of sight. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a film about the prison in which we never see a penitentiary. Instead, the film unfolds as a cinematic journey through a series of landscapes across the USA where prisons do work and affect lives, from a California mountainside where female prisoners fight raging wildfires, to a Bronx warehouse full of goods destined for the state correctional system, to an Appalachian coal town betting its future on the promise of prison jobs.”

More information about the film can be found here: https://www.prisonlandscapes.com/

BRETT STORY (Producer/Director of The Prison in Twelve Landscapes) is a writer and independent non-fiction filmmaker based out of Toronto and New York. Her first feature-length film, the award-winning Land of Destiny (2010), screened internationally and was broadcast on both Canadian and American television. Her journalism and film criticism have appeared in such outlets as CBC Radio, the Nation Magazine, and the Toronto Review of Books. Since 2012, Brett has been part of the critically acclaimed HIGHRISE web-doc project team, produced by the National Film Board of Canada. She was the recipient of the Documentary Organization of Canada Institute’s 2014 New Visions Award, is an alumna of the Berlinale Talents Doc Station (2014) and was a nominee for the 2015 Ontario Premier’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts. Brett holds a PhD in geography from the University of Toronto and is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center.
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The PJFF is a coalition of activists and grass roots organizers with big ideas. We are interested in raising awareness and opposition to the expansion of the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC). Our goal is to bring people together to start a dialogue about the prison industrial complex, multi-issue movement building, alternative forms of justice and ways in which we can start a vibrant anti-PIC movement in London, Ontario (lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples) and more globally.

For more information on the PJFF, please visit their website:
http://www.prisonersjusticefilmfestival.ca/

Or visit PJFF on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/PJFFLondon/?fref=ts